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README.md

dlayer-knex

Small utility for adding database support to your dlayer schema, using Knex, with minimum viable functionality that doesn't get in your way.

  • Currently supports SQLite and PostgreSQL only (as this library needs to do a level of introspection that Knex does not have implementations for)
  • Deliberately very limited featureset and API surface; you are expected to manually specify complex queries in your graph (and dlayer's extension system makes this possible)
  • Current status: beta. Should work fine, but if it breaks, you get to keep both halves.
  • Documentation may be incomplete.

Realistic-ish example

const knex = require("knex");
const dlayer = require("dlayer");
const dlayerKnex = require("dlayer-knex");

let db = knex(require("./knexfile").development);

let knexUsers = await dlayerKnex.generateModule(db, "users");

let knexThreads = await dlayerKnex.generateModule(db, "threads", {
	user_id: [ "user", "threads" ]
});

let knexPosts = await dlayerKnex.generateModule(db, "posts", {
	user_id: [ "user", "posts" ],
	thread_id: [ "thread", "posts" ]
});

let api = dlayer({
	makeContext: () => ({}),
	modules: [
		knexUsers.module,
		knexPosts.module,
		knexThreads.module
	],
	schema: {
		users: knexUsers.rootQueries,
		threads: knexThreads.rootQueries,
		posts: knexPosts.rootQueries
	}
});

let { moreThan, lessThan, not } = dlayerKnex;
let testResult = await api.query({
	users: {
		list: {
			$arguments: {
				filter: { id: not(lessThan(2)) }
			},
			id: true,
			username: true,
			threads: {
				id: true,
				subject: true,
				user: {
					id: true,
					username: true
				}
			}
		}
	}
});

/* 
testResult = {
	users: {
		list: [{
			id: 2,
			username: 'joepie91',
			threads: [{
				id: 2,
				subject: 'Test 2',
				user: {
					id: 2,
					username: 'joepie91'
				}
			}, {
				id: 3,
				subject: 'Test 3',
				user: {
					id: 2,
					username: 'joepie91'
				}
			}]
		}, {
			id: 3,
			username: 'bar',
			threads: [{
				id: 1,
				subject: 'Test 1',
				user: {
					id: 3,
					username: 'bar'
				}
			}]
		}, {
			id: 4,
			username: null,
			threads: []
		}]
	}
}
*/

API

generateModule(knexInstance, tableName, relations)

Relations are always defined on the table which stores the referenced ID in a column; the inverse relationship will be automatically created on the foreign table.

The foreign key already needs to be set up in the database schema - dlayer-knex reads out the table schema to set up the relations! The values you specify here are only to indicate on which fields of the dlayer-knex-generated objects you want the relations to be available.

So assuming that in the schema, threads.user_id points to users.id, then with this definition:

let knexThreads = await dlayerKnex.generateModule(db, "threads", {
	user_id: [ "user", "threads" ]
});

... that means that the following fields are created:

  • A user field on any threads objects created by dlayer-knex, referencing the corresponding object from users where users.id = threads.user_id
  • A threads field on any users objects created by dlayer-knex, with a list of all records from the threads table that have threads.user_id set to the users object's id

(This is equivalent to a set of belongsTo and hasMany relations in many ORMs, you just only specify the destination field names in dlayer-knex's config.)

Through-relations, ie. using many-to-many tables, are not explicitly supported in dlayer-knex, but they don't need to be; you can simply treat the intermediate table as its own type with its own definition and relations, and do two steps of relation-resolving in your dlayer query.

For example, if you have a communities and users table, then the many-to-many table that links them together might be called memberships, and you might end up with a query like users[0].memberships.community to obtain that user's communities. (This is pseudocode, dlayer does not currently use that sort of syntax, but you hopefully get the idea!)

lessThan(value), moreThan(value)

Pretty much what it says on the tin; can be used in query arguments in place of exact values.

anyOf(arrayOfValues)

Can be used in query arguments in place of exact values. Will filter for the value being one of the specified values, rather than just a single one. Cannot currently be wrapped around lessThan, moreThan, or not - that might be added in the future, if people have a good reason for it.

not(value)

Negates the match. Can be wrapped around a lessThan/moreThan/anyOf wrapper, but not around another not wrapper. Can also be used with exact values.

dlayer module schema

The generateModule method generates a dlayer module and a number of root queries, that you can use in your dlayer schema. The module defines the following things:

  • A type representing records from the specified table; it will be named dlayer-knex.TABLE_NAME, where TABLE_NAME is the name of the table in the database. This is the name you should use when extending the type, eg. to add complex queries.
  • Extensions for any other dlayer-knex types, that are necessary to generate inverse relations. You don't generally have to care about these.
  • A dlayerKnexTable value in the module's context, which is a DataLoader that fetches items from the table by its primary key. You don't generally have to care about this, unless you need to work around an API limitation; in that case, you can use dlayer's $getModuleContext utility function to access it, but keep in mind that this context value is not included in the semver guarantees for this library, and may break between releases.

Separately, a set of root queries is also generated, which you can insert into your root schema where it fits your usecase. Often this will be in a top-level property with the same name as the table, but it doesn't need to be there. These root queries are:

list

Equivalent to a SELECT query, retrieves existing records from a table. Possible arguments:

  • filter: an object of predicates to match records against, optionally using moreThan/lessThan/anyOf/not.
  • orderBy: a column/field name to order the results by; ascending by default, prefix it with a - to sort descendingly.
  • skip: the amount of records to skip at the start; also known as an 'offset' or 'start'.
  • limit: the amount of records to retrieve, counting from the first non-skipped record.
  • first: when set to true, only return the first result (or undefined), rather than a list of results.

This query produces a list of records according to your criteria (or a single one, if first has been used).

delete

Equivalent to a DELETE query, deletes records from a table. Possible arguments:

  • filter: an object of predicates to match records against, same as for list. Only these records will be deleted.

Produces an object { count: Number } to tell you how many records were deleted.

change

Equivalent to an UPDATE query, changes existing records in a table, based on some predicate. Possible arguments:

  • filter: an object of predicates to match records against, same as for list. Only these records will be changed.
  • values: an object of new values to set for the matched records. Relation fields are ignored; you need to set their underlying ID references instead. Only literal values can be specified here.

This query produces a list of the matched records, after having been updated with the specified new values.

create

Equivalent to an INSERT query, creates new records in a table. Possible arguments:

  • values: an array of objects, that should be created in the table. Here, again, relation fields are ignored, and you need to set their underlying ID references. Only literal values accepted.

Produces a list of the newly created records, after having been inserted into the database; ie. including their new automatically-assigned ID.